Patriotic Scottish wrestler disqualified for keeping his kilt on

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A SCOTTISH wrestler who refused to remove his kilt during an English competition found himself disqualified by the judges.

Ryan Dolan, of Carnoustie near Dundee, was to compete in the 14 stone category at the Lake District sporting event but was disqualified by the judges at the weigh-in.

The annual Lakeland Sports judges were checking all the wrestlers were under the 14 stone limit but when 6ft 4inch Ryan’s heavy kilt tipped the scales over the edge, he found himself in a difficult situation.

Ryan Dolan website
Patriotic 19-year-old Ryan Dolan

The 19-year-old, known as the “mighty giraffe” refused to shed the garment and as a result was sidelined by the judges.

But Ryan, of the Carnoustie Backhold Wrestling Club, went on to compete in the ‘all-weights’ category where he took home the gold.

The patriotic wrestler said: “I’m not going to go into what was said between me and the official in public.

 “But I am fiercely proud about wearing my kilt and lucky white top and I will continue to wear them in every event I compete in.”

William Baxter, president of the International Federation of Celtic Wrestling, said: “At the unofficial weigh-in he was under 14 stone, and everything seemed okay, but at the official weigh-in disaster struck.

“He was overweight wearing his kilt.”

He added: “That is fine for the English who compete in tights and florally embroidered silk vests, but the Scots compete wearing the kilt and when he was told by the officials to take off his kilt to make the weight he refused and was disqualified.”

Ryan, known as the “mighty giraffe” by his teammates, took home the 1st in the Heavyweight category, beating long time rival, Olafur, from Iceland.

The wrestler showing off his kilt
The wrestler showing off his kilt

Carnoustie Backhold Wrestling Club was founded by Frazer Hirsch in October 2012 and is open to both boys and girls of all ages.

The Backhold Wrestling style involves two wrestlers “taking hold” of each other and clasping their hands behind their opponents backs.

The wrestlers then attempt to trip or throw each other while maintaining the hold and the first to touch the floor with any part of their body, except their feet, loses.

Wearing kilts is necessary for club members during championship events as they add to the viewing pleasure of those witnessing the peculiar sport.

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