Delight as Mackenzie, 10, “beats cancer’s butt”

0
6
Mackenzie is all smiles as she takes in cancer and wins
Mackenzie is all smiles as she takes in cancer and wins
A BRAVE schoolgirl who whose treatment for cancer made Scottish medical history has beaten the disease.

 

Mackenzie Furness, 10, told her delighted fans on social media that she had “kicked cancer’s butt”.

 

Mackenzie, from Sauchie, Clackmannanshire, was the first person to have a haploidentical stem cell transplant in Scotland.

 

The treatment, carried by a German doctor, was her last hope of beating the childhood cancer neuroblastoma.

 

10 year-old Mackenzie was the first person to have a haploidentical stem cell transplant in Scotland.
10 year-old Mackenzie was the first person to have a haploidentical stem cell transplant in Scotland.

 

Mackenzie received the stem cells from her father at hospital in Glasgow.

 

That was followed by months of treatment in Stuttgart aimed at stopping the rejection of the transplanted cells.

 

After a doctor gave Mackenzie the all-clear she posted a picture on Facebook which showed her beaming while holding up a multicoloured home made sign saying “I beat cancer’s butt for the second time”.

 

Mackenzie’s  family, including father Jason, 40, and mum, Kimberley, 39, thanked everyone who donated to the fund for her treatment.

 

The message said: “Every time we look at Mackenzie we will be reminded that it is all possible because so many people believed in her and gave her a chance at LIFE.”

 

Mackenzie will be tested every three months in case of relapse but her family confirmed the treatment was a success and her body showed no signs of the cancer.

 

Mackenzie is all smiles thanks to the treatment which involved stem cells from her dad Jason.
Mackenzie is all smiles thanks to the treatment which involved stem cells from her dad Jason.

 

Mackenzie made headlines last year after she was treated by Professor Peter Lang at Yorkhill in Glasgow.

 

The follow-up treatment was at the Children’s Hospital in Stuttgart.

 

Her family raised over half of the £300,000 cost with the Scottish Government stepping in with the rest.

 

Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer, which affects around 8% of all child cancer cases,
according to Macmillan Cancer Support.

 

Last night, Mackenzie’s Facebook page was deluged with messages of congratulation.

 

Pamela Giordano McLennan said: “This just made my day. Look at that face. Such a beautiful child who most
definitely deserves a chance at life! “

 

And Warwick Veck wrote: Well done Mackenzie, it’s your courage and determination and the love of your family
and their belief in you that did it. Good luck for the future and God bless you.

 

By Katherine Sutherland

NO COMMENTS