Former Government tsar says Scotland should have cannabis cafes

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A FORMER UK Government adviser has said the Scots should go Dutch and open cannabis cafes.

Professor David Nutt, who in the past has advised the Ministry of Defence, Department of Health and the Home Office, said it could be “very good” for the economy.

The professor, who was sacked by the UK Government in 2009 after saying horse riding was more dangerous than taking ecstasy, also blasted plans to tackle legal highs.

 

Joint-web

 

Speaking ahead of talk in Edinburgh Prof. Nutt, based at Imperial College London, said: “If Scotland had a sensible medical cannabis policy you’d get a lot of health tourists and that would be very good for your economy.

“People could have a cuppa in cafes in Edinburgh and Glasgow and have a spliff as the do in Amsterdam.

“And you could also open up some of your Victorian hotels and have them as spas for people having cannabis treatments.”

Prof Nutt also described the Scottish Government’s pledge made last week to tackle legal highs as “ridiculous”.

He said it was “a gesture that politicians use in order to avoid confronting the big challenge that is alcohol”.

A spokesman for the Scottish Government said: “We have been consistent in out position that cannabis is both illegal and dangerous to health, physical and mental.”

2 COMMENTS

  1. Health concerns regarding marijuana tend to come from a self-fueling group of discredited scientists funded by the pharmaceutical, prison, tobacco, and alcohol industries. They push non-peer-reviewed papers, fraught with conjecture and confounding variables, while relying upon reports issued by others in their own group to further support their own grossly misleading research and clearly biased agendas.

    The Duke University (New Zealand) study, the one which claimed that smoking marijuana in your teens leads to a long-term drop in IQ, has since been utterly rebuked by a new paper, published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that examined the research and found its methodology to be flawed.

    “…existing research suggests an alternative confounding model based on time-varying effects of socioeconomic status on IQ. A simulation of the confounding model reproduces the reported associations from the [August 2012 study], suggesting that the causal effects estimated in Meier et al. are likely to be overestimates, and that the true effect could be zero”.
    —Ole Rogeberg.

  2. Typical Malcolm Pyle myth.

    The World Health Organisation report in 1997 on Cannabis, spelled out the harms, since then the various harms have been spelt out many times.

    Professor Nutt is being mischievous, he should and probably does know, that drug policy is national and that Scotland cannot legally do its own thing.

    Furthermore Scotland has a serious problem, worse than most of the UK on the legal drugs of tobacco/alcohol.

    This is cultural. Responsible politicians in Scotland will not want to do anything that will lower community resistance to more drugs use, of any sort of drug, legal or illegal.

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