JK Rowling suffering “writer’s back”

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JK ROWLING has revealed she is suffering “writer’s back” from sitting in her chair for too long.

The multi-millionaire author, 49, confirmed yesterday (Thu) that her condition is so bad that she felt her “vertebrae had fused”.

She wrote to her 4.5m twitter fans: “I have Writer’s back, which is a painful condition resulting from sitting in a chair for eight solid hours (I did get up to make tea).”

She added: “Feel free to send sympathy, even though I concede that this might not be the most serious problem anyone’s got. Not even in my own house.”

Hundreds of followers replied to Rowling's plea for help
Hundreds of followers replied to Rowling’s plea for help

 

Her plea opened the floodgates as hundreds of fans sent pain relief suggestions, ranging from products and yoga moves to standing desks.

One devoted follower came up with the idea she write her novels while suspended in a hammock, another said she should try a shiatsu massage pillow, and one even suggested she invest in a house elf to knead her back.

The Harry Potter author had been sat down for 8 hours

 

One fan, Will Hackney, said: “I have Rowling Back, which is a sad condition resulting from sitting and waiting for JK Rowling to tweet you back.”

Rowling did take on some of the suggestions. Shortly after her first tweet, she announced: “I just tried bending over and hanging with my face by my knees, which helped.”

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And she vowed to ask her followers for advice more often, comparing them with “an online Bad Back Symposium full of unnaturally friendly experts”.

One extremely devoted fan said: “You could ask us how to hide a dead body and we wouldn’t even hesitate to help you.”

Rowling replied that she wasn’t sure whether to be touched by the gesture, or scared.

Her last book, The Silkworm, is a crime novel released last summer under the pen name Robert Galbraith.

On May 5 – World Book Day – she announced she was writing a new novel, much to the delight of her fanbase.

The Harry Potter books have sold more than 450 million copies worldwide, and have been made into films that made £4.7 billion at the box office.

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