Chris Hoy shares “spitting image” picture of son

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CHRIS Hoy has revealed his son’s first ever passport photo – and he is the “spitting image” of his father.

The Scots cycling legend uploaded a picture of son Callum’s passport on social media, which shows the 7-month-old dressed in a white shirt with blue striped dungarees.

Young Callum can be seen looking straight at the camera, with a smart haircut and rosy cheeks.

Sir Chris wrote: “Callum’s first passport photo. Puts a smile on my face just looking at it! :)”

Sir Chris uploaded the snap of his son's first passport photo
Sir Chris uploaded the snap of his son’s first passport photo

 

Fans were quick to point out the similarities between the baby and his father.

One person said: “Spitting image of his daddy there.”

Mereley Darren asked: “Mini me?”

Phil G added: “My god he is the image of you. Lovely to see him healthy.”

One follower suggested that he looked more like his mum.

Alison McKenna wrote: “Soooo cute. Takes after his mum.”

Fellow cyclist Dame Sarah Storey also sent Sir Chris a message, saying that she had “chats with passport control” about her own daughter’s picture.

Sir Chris said having a baby "changed him" in many ways
Sir Chris said having a baby “changed him” in many ways

 

She wrote: “Awww that’s so cute, we have chats to passport control about Louisa’s.”

Callum was born 11 weeks early last October – which left 39-year-old Chris and his wife Sarra “a little shocked”.

The baby, whose full name is Callum David Robert Hoy, was kept in incubators in intensive care after being born at just 29 weeks.

After putting on weight he was allowed out of hospital in time to celebrate his first Christmas at home.

Speaking earlier this year, Sir Chris, who retired in 2013, admitted fatherhood had changed his priorities in life.

He said: “It’s changed me in many ways, really.

“Sarra is the one who has taken the brunt of the sleep deprivation because if I’m working, she’ll do the night shift and make the sacrifice.

“You have a different perspective. You realise the things that are worth worrying about, the things that aren’t.

“Everyone says that once you have kids, you never stop worrying.

“There’s always something to worry about, no matter what age they are — 18 months or 18 years.

“You do start worrying about the things that are important.”

 

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