Andy Murray admits using a shrink to deal with pressure of big matches


ANDY MURRAY has revealed he is seeing a psychiatrist in a bid to “understand” himself better as he prepares to battle it out at Wimbledon this week.

The Scot says being “open and honest” about his feelings to a medical professional is helping him prepare for big matches.

The former Wimbledon champ and British No. 1 will take to the grass on Tuesday in a bid to relive the glory of 2013 when he became the first British man to clinch the title in 77 years.

Now the 28-year-old, who has a history of on court temper tantrums, has found a new way to deal with the pressure and get “genuine enjoyment” from his matches.

He has gone one step further than the usual sports psychologist and has employed the medical skills of a “shrink”.

“I used a lot of sports psychologists when I was younger,” Murray explained. “Sometimes it helped, sometimes it didn’t.”

He continued: “But the stuff I’m doing now helps because I’m actually interested in learning about how the brain works rather than being told how to count to 10, or whatever, to calm yourself down.”

He said: “You have to be open and honest about the thoughts and feelings that you have. If you don’t, and you lie about things to make yourself look stronger and tougher, it’s pointless.”

Murray has not revealed the identity of his psychiatrist, apart from to say it’s a man.

He added: “It’s more about understanding myself better, and I think the better you understand yourself it does helps you before big matches.”

The pressure of being the British No. 1 has also had an impact on his mother and former coach Judy Murray.

Speaking ahead of the start of the tournament she admitted she doesn’t enjoy Wimbledon.

“I used to enjoy it,” Judy Murray said. “But so much stress comes with the pressure and expectation that is on Andy and the fact that the spotlight is very much on us as a family.

“The hopes of the nation are always on him. He handles it, and has handled it for many years, unbelievably well.”