Pharmacist who branded cancer drug customer a “retard” escapes with warning


A FOUL-mouthed pharmacist has escaped with a warning despite branding a customer collecting cancer drugs as a “retard”.

Charles Shanks, who runs Calder Pharmacy in Edinburgh, wrote a scathing Facebook post last April after a customer complained that medication was missing from her order.

The woman had been told by Mr Shanks in April last year that he was unable to provide her with her father’s pain relief for cancer as they were out of stock.

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The pharmacist has been working at Calder Pharmacy since the rant back in April last year.

But later that day the 54-year-old expert went on a foul mouthed rant on the social media site, saying that she had gone “total retard”.

He added:  “All my lovely staff know just where I’m coming from and what I will do when said f***tard comes in tomorrow”.

He added: “So tonight some f***tard commented on Facebook how us at Calder Pharmacy were not doing our jobs properly or being professional.

“Sorry deary but no matter how good we are we cannot conjure up drugs we don’t have in stock from f***ing fresh air.”

“How that makes us unprofessional I don’t f****** know but maybe if we were at Hogwarts instead of Calder Pharmacy we might have managed it.

“Look forward to seeing you tomorrow when you come in to pick up said drugs.

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Mr Shanks teaches self defence in his spare time.

“I certainly won’t leave you with the shirt on your back you total f***tard.”

After finding out, NHS chiefs immediately launched an investigation into the incident and in December last year, the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) decided to let Mr Shanks off with a warning.

However, the case was not revealed at the time by the GPhC because it is not their “protocol” to publicise cases unless they go to a full hearing.

During the investigation Mr Shanks, who teaches self defence in his spare time, continued to run the pharmacy.

Jill Rennie, 33, the customer that was the subject of the rant, told her local newspaper she was “really shocked”.

Ms Rennie said she had yet to be formally notified of the judgement despite providing a statement.

She said: “I would have felt bad if he had lost his whole career over an incident with me, but I certainly think he should have got something more than a warning.”

Ms Shanks insisted she would have taken further action herself if her dad hadn’t sadly passed away just weeks after the abusive post.

She now avoids passing the pharmacy and nearby row of shops in fears that she could bump into Mr Shanks.

A spokesman for the GPhC confirmed the warning would remain on Mr Shanks’ entry in the register for two years and that there are currently no restrictions on Mr Shanks’ ability to practise as a pharmacist.

He added: “The warning has been issued to ensure public confidence in the profession and regulatory process and to protect the public by reminding the registrant concerned to adhere to all legal and professional obligations in their practice in the future.”

Mr Shanks said that due to the conditions of his warning he would be unable to comment.