Hilarious Father’s Day drawing turns dad in to Supermanhood


A DAUGHTER drew her dad as Superman for Father’s Day – but turned him into Supermanhood.

Neve Heron, six, gave dad Alan a superhero-style cape but the sketch actually makes it look like the 44-year-old is freakishly well-endowed.

The hilarious image was shared online by Neve’s mum, Kirsty, who wrote: “That’s my husband, drawn by my daughter. Not how I’d have done it.”

Neve's depiction of her Dad
Neve’s depiction of her Dad

Alan, however, is very proud of the sketch and is considering having it framed.

Neve, from Cumbernauld, North Lanarkshire, spent 20 minutes crafting an image of her superhero father wearing a red and blue costume complete with black belt.

But when she handed her creation to 44-year-old Alan, he couldn’t help but burst into laughter.

Kirsty, 42, said: “Neve’s favourite thing is drawing so we had no idea she was doing it. She disa

ppeared into the dining room and came back into the living room 20 minutes later proudly showing off her card to him.

Neve couldn't understand why her parents were laughing
Neve couldn’t understand why her parents were laughing

“We both just buckled and laughed and she was a bit offended as she obviously didn’t know why we were laughing and is very sensitive, so thought we didn’t like her picture.

“Alan however is very proud of the drawing and is thinking about framing it for his desk at work.”

Alongside the side-splitting card Alan, who works as an operations manager for FEP Healthcare in Hillington, received some new pyjamas and a framed picture made out of scrabble letters from Neve and her twin sister, Olivia.

Alan with his two daughters when they were younger
Alan with his two daughters when they were younger

Commenting on the photograph, Leonie Doyle said: “Lucky you.”

Dusty Farmer joked: “As a matter of fairness perhaps you should draw your version.”

Katie Warmisham added: “Hold on…Superman’s cape is red. This kid knew exactly what she was drawing.”

The post also prompted other parents to share their own children’s drawing mishaps, which many said they would keep “for future embarrassment purposes”.