Red faces at Tesco as science toy tells kids to make “labial moisturiser”


A SCIENCE toy is being sold by Tesco with the startling claim that it can help children make their own “labial moisturiser”.

The £10 toy called My First Spa aims to teach youngsters about skin treatments and the benefits of using such products.

But Tesco have been left red-faced after a parent highlighted the firm’s online sales pitch for the item which encourages children to experiment.

Alongside claims about cucumber helping “tired” eyes, youngsters are told the spa can help with a more intimate part of the female anatomy.


The description said the toy would help kids make their own "labial moisturiser"
The description said the toy would help kids make their own “labial moisturiser”


Kat Shaw posted her concerns on the Tesco’s Facebook page, writing: “I was very excited today to see that your ‘My First Spa’ set is half price in your toy sale.

“’£10, bargain!’ I thought, ‘perhaps I’ll buy it for my soon to be three year old so we can have a ‘girly’ night together.’

“I was so looking forward to making our own scented oils, special eye treatments and exfoliating scrubs.

“I’m not entirely convinced that she (or indeed anyone) will require the ‘labial moisturiser’ though.

“Perhaps you might want to reconsider this wording on the website? It’s ever so slightly unfortunate.”

Luciano, from the Tesco customer care team, replied: “Oh my, I’m very sorry about the poor working on this product description. I will ensure this is fed back to our Commercial Team,” he said.

The full description of the toy on Tesco’s page reads: “Learn to create with Science4you.
“My First Spa teaches children about scented oils, special eye treatments and different exfoliating scrubs as well as massage oils.

“They will find out how cucumber can remove that tired look in the eyes and make their own labial moisturiser.

“Children can set up their own Spa and invite family and friends to try out the homemade products and massage techniques.”

Other Facebook users were equally shocked by the choice of words used in the toy’s product details.

Danielle Bailey wrote: “My god. Was going to buy Jasmine this. She would ask what the word meant!”

Teena Dickerson commented to warn her friend: “Please do not buy this!”

A Tesco spokesman said: “The description of this product includes an error, so we have taken the webpage offline while we correct it.”


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