Joiner makes amazing recovery after suffering a stroke

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A JOINER who was almost killed by a stroke has created a 25kg chair which he photographs in iconic Scottish locations as a symbol of recovery.

Michael Yuill was left in a coma, unable to walk and temporarily blind when the stroke struck six years ago.

But the amazingly determined 53-year-old recovered enough to build the tartan chair and then haul it to dozens of locations hundreds of miles apart in Scotland.

Michael Yuill with his chair on the Campsie Fells
Michael Yuill with his chair on the Campsie Fells

Michael ran his own joinery business and climbed Scottish peaks before he was left disabled by the incident.

The chair is made completely from reclaimed wood, and is painted wholly black, except a tartan strip along the back.

The plan to take the furniture across Scotland was first suggested by his friends as a joke, but now, Michael, his ten-year old son Josh, and his pals take it on all their trips, including hiking with it up several hills in the Campsie Fells, Stirlingshire.

Other locations they have visited with it include the southern point of the West Highland Way at Milngavie, which Michael walked completely before his stroke, and Loch Katrine.

He has taken the furniture as far afield as Dunnottar Castle, a ruined medieval fortress in Stonehaven, some 130 miles from his Glasgow home, and even plans to take it to Ben Nevis.

Michael Yuill's chair with famous Tom Weir's statue at Loch Lomond A JOINER who was almost killed by a stroke has created a 25kg chair which he photographs in iconic Scottish locations as a symbol of recovery. Michael Yuill was left in a coma, unable to walk and temporarily blind when the stroke struck six years ago. But he recovered enough to build the tartan chair and then haul it to dozens of locations hundreds of miles apart in Scotland. The 53-year-old ran his own joinery business and climbed Scottish peaks before he was left disabled by the incident. The chair is made completely from reclaimed wood, and is painted wholly black, except a tartan strip along the back. The plan to take the furniture across Scotland was first suggested by his friends as a joke, but now, Michael, his ten-year old son Josh, and his pals take it on all their trips, including hiking with it up several hills in the Campsie Fells, Stirlingshire. Other locations they have visited with it include the southern point of the West Highland Way at Milngavie, which Michael walked completely before his stroke, and Loch Katrine. He has taken the furniture as far afield as Dunnottar Castle, a ruined medieval fortress in Stonehaven, some 130 miles from his Glasgow home, and even plans to take it to Ben Nevis.
Michael Yuill’s chair with famous Tom Weir’s statue at Loch Lomond

Michael said: “I had a stroke six years ago, I was in a coma for four days, for two weeks I was blind, couldn’t drive for nine months and couldn’t talk for a year.

“I was told at the time it would be six years before I could talk again and at first I was talking like something off the clangers!

“I was very lucky. Now, I feel fit, although its been a wee while. It’s all coming back slowly, but I’m getting it.

“I’m hoping in January to get going with my business, Tartan Wood, and building the chair was to help me get back into joinery after the stroke. All the wood is reclaimed, and I cut it and glued it, which took about 14 days.

“The walking with the chair started off as a joke. My pals said to me to start taking it with me, and now I’m taking the chair with me everywhere in Scotland.

“It weighs four stone and I’ve got a group of guys walking with me, we all take turns carrying the chair. We carry it on our backs. The plan is to take it up Ben Nevis.”

Bannockburn had a visit from Michael Yuill and his chair
Bannockburn had a visit from Michael Yuill and his chair

Michael’s chair is proving a hit with Facebook users.

A picture he shared of himself with the chair in the Campsies received over 400 likes on Facebook, and was commented on hundreds of times

Sheila Mahon wrote: “The chair on its travels! I love that chair.”

Jimmy Allen said: “Your work and craftsmanship is outstanding my friend. Keep up the work.”

Milngavie, start of the West Highland Way
Milngavie, start of the West Highland Way

Flora McGillivray wrote: “You have created a wonderful chair, great craftsmanship and loads of storyies about where you’ve been with your chair!”

He even had messages from potential customers, with Elspeth Burns writing:

“Micheal your craftsmanship is amazing and I am interested in finding out more about your work, time frames, prices etc.

“I will definitely come and see your work as I am interested in the tall chair you have displayed and the console tables. Will arrange times cannot wait.”

 
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