Almost one in 10 Scots teachers abused on social media – by another teacher

0
36
ALMOST one in ten teachers in Scotland has suffered abuse on social media – from another member of the profession.
The General Teaching Council for Scotland gives advice to teachers on their website, recommending: “use your discretion when dealing with friend requests from parents.
A poll of more than 1,000 Scottish Secondary Teachers Association (SSTA) members showed that 8% of teachers had a “negative experience” on social media involving other staff members.
One teacher told how a colleague joined in with parents on social media to complain about the treatment of a child struggling at school.
The teacher revealed: “Heard of parents slagging off teachers, including me, on Facebook because their child is underperforming.
“One of them was actually a primary teacher herself.”
The survey also revealed that 14% of teachers had a “negative experience” online involving parents and 24% involving pupils. Only 48% of the profession said they were “confident” or “very confident” using social media.
Some 12% of teachers admitted they never use social media and 36% revealed their school does not have a policy on using Facebook and other platforms.
Other anecdotes included a teacher who complained: “A secret Facebook group provided a forum for bitching, complaining and stirring up the unrest. It caused a lot of problems with people spreading gossip, and even lies on occasion.”
Another teacher told how police had been involved following comments made online.
“Parent choosing to be offensive about a member of the department on Facebook,” reported the teacher.
“Obviously didn’t think it would be seen by tecahing staff as she wasn’t friends with the person. Was all round the school. Police involved.”
Another incident included: “Parent who saw me on dating website tracked me down on Facebook and harrased me regularly.”
The details were revealed in education magazine, TES today (FRI) following an investigation into social media abuse.
Mike Corbett, an executive member of the The National Association of Schoolmasters Union of Women Teachers, said parents abusing teachers online was “undoubtedly a growing problem”.
Eileen Prior, executive director of the Scottish Parent Teacher Council, expressed how some people used social media just to “bully and victimise” others but added that online platforms are also “enormously beneficial”.
The General Teaching Council for Scotland gives advice to teachers on their website, recommending: “use your discretion when dealing with friend requests from parents.
“It is acceptable to decline these invitations and remind parents of more formal channels for discussing their child’s education.”
ENDS

NO COMMENTS