Make former shipping containers your home – for £350,000

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TWO futuristic homes boasting glass floors, geothermal heating and artificial grass roofs are on sale for a combined total of £825,000 – and they’re both made from shipping containers.

The neighbouring properties in Crossford, South Lanarkshire, feature glass floors which reveal a tributary of the Clyde flowing beneath.

And the buyers will get a cheque for £3,400 every year from the government for using renewable energy.

The three-bedroom property is on sale for £475,000 while the two-bedroom version is £350,000.

Both Lego-like properties are made from 40ft shipping containers with the bigger home clad in red and the smaller in yellow material.

TWO futuristic homes boasting glass floors, geothermal heating and artificial grass roofs are on sale for a combined total of £825,000 – and they’re both made from shipping containers.

They have been constructed above the River Nethan which is always visible from a section of glass flooring in the living room.

Both feature huge roof terraces with artificial turf. The heating systems work by burying pipes about 12 metres underground where the temperature is a constant 50 degrees centrigrade.

The properties were inspired by farmer and architect Patrick Bradley who decided to create his perfect home out of four shipping containers in Northern Ireland during an episode of Channel 4’s Grand Designs.

They have been constructed above the River Nethan which is always visible from a section of glass flooring in the living room.

Marketing agents for the three-bedrrom, Clyde Property, state: “A truly magical ‘Grand Design’ home, located in the charming village of Crossford and set on the banks of the River Nethan.

“Regarded as one of Scotland’s most unique homes, the property has been thoughtfully engineered and would be appealing to all age groups on the current market place.”

Marketing the two-bedroom home next door, Igloo estate agency decribed the house as a “truly unique new build property with an array of features and benefits.”

Earlier this year, new student accommodation in Glasgow was built using over 500 shipping containers while in Cardiff last month containers were transformed in to temporary houses for the homeless.

The recylced containers are known for being a cost effective way of building houses and are very durable.

 
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