Spaceports Invited to Submit Proposals for Future Rocket Launches

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Volodymyr Levykin, CEO. Edinburgh space company Skyrora has invited international spaceport operators, to submit their proposals to launch any of the firm’s three rockets. Skyrora, who successfully launched Skylark Nano last year, are set to launch the ”Skylark Micro II", "SkyHy" and "SK-1" vehicles within the next 12 months - with two of the rockets already built and assembled in Britain.
Volodymyr Levykin, Skyrora CEO

A SPACE company has invited international spaceport operators, to submit their proposals to launch any of the firm’s three rockets.

Skyrora, who successfully launched Skylark Nano last year, are set to launch the ”Skylark Micro II”, “SkyHy” and “SK-1” vehicles within the next 12 months – with two of the rockets already built and assembled in Britain.

Volodymyr Levykin, CEO at Skyrora, said: “We are growing and moving rapidly on all sides of the business to offer an attractive service to our existing and future customers, 15 of whom have already declared their interest by signing letters of intent.”

The selection process for UK spaceports depends on various factors including adequate health & safety provision, earliest launch facilitation, and telemetry station and tracking systems.

Launch locations will benefit from the test missions by giving them the chance to gain valuable experience and demonstrate their readiness for competing at a global level for future orbital launches.

The first vehicle, set for a 40 km sub-orbital trajectory test in April, will be the two-stage Skylark Micro II.

The unguided rocket launched on commercially available solid rocket motors is designed to develop and de-risk the technologies and evaluate avionics and ground system telemetry.

The next two rockets, SkyHy and SK-1 are scheduled to launch during the second half of the year, will be capable of crossing the Kármán line into space, something that no private company has ever done from UK soil before.

The SkyHy vehicle, developed in collaboration with acclaimed rocket engineer Richard M Brown, will be their first mission using hydrogen peroxide, representing an important stepping stone between Skyrora’s solid and bi-liquid propulsion systems.

It is ideal for building a smart upper stage that can restart and manoeuvre satellites into different orbits allowing cost-effective launch opportunities for larger commercial operators that require precise launch dates or that plan to launch a series of small satellites with their own specifications.

The hybrid engine combines a mix of solid fuel, Hydroxyl Terminated Polybutadiene (HTP) and liquid Hydrogen Peroxide oxidiser, which has a cleaner burn, giving payloads a smoother ride resulting in less potential vibration damage. It has already proven its suitability on the Black Arrow mission.

The SK-1 (total length of 10.7 m) is a guided single-stage suborbital launch vehicle capable of launching a 100 kg payload to a height of over 100 km. SK-1 will feature the same onboard control systems as the orbital launch vehicle Skyrora is developing, making it an ideal final test mission before the launch of their first orbital vehicle.

 
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