Hardie Polymers Backs Glasgow University Covid-19 Research

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A Scottish polymer supplier has backed the University of Glasgow’s Covid-19 research being undertaken by making a donation for medical orders the business receives.

Hardie Polymers will donate the money received for May and June to help the university’s research.

Since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, Hardie Polymers has seen a sharp spike in the number of orders for engineering polymers used to manufacture medical parts, and wanted to show its support for those engaged in vital research work.

The Clydebank-based family owned business was established in 1924 and is the UK’s leading independent thermoplastic distributor of engineering and high performance polymers to the injection moulding sector.

Hardie Polymers, managind director Fergus Hardie centre (before lockdown) image supplied  

Hardie Polymers managing director, Fergus Hardie, said: “For more than 500 years Glasgow has been at the front of medical advancement. The Medical Research Council – University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research (CVR) – is today home to the largest group of virologists in the UK and it is playing a leading role in the research response to COVID-19.

“We have been inundated with requests for engineering polymers for medical parts since the outbreak began and our team have gone above and beyond to get these materials to all the UK injection moulding companies out there who are supporting this great national manufacturing effort.

“With alumni from the University of Glasgow amongst our sales team and also a supply relationship with the University, we want to make a contribution to their excellent work to help defeat this virus, and we decided to make a donation for every polymer order we receive in May and June for medical applications.”

In addition to the medical and healthcare sector, Hardie Polymers also supplies manufacturers working in the aerospace, automotive, defence, electronics and trade moulding sectors.

 
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