Majority of adults in Britain have rotten teeth, according to new study

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50% UK adults have tooth decay
Even sugar free drinks can wreak havoc on teeth

MORE than half of adults in the UK have damaged or rotting teeth according to a dental hygiene company.

Spotlight Oral Care say that despite the introduction of sugar tax introduced in 2018, sugar consumption has continued to rise in the UK.

The country ranked in the bottom ten worldwide for sugar consumption, prompting concerns about the effect on our teeth.

According to the NHS, consuming too much sugar can have two main adverse effects; weight gain and tooth decay. 

Tooth decay on the rise in the UK is the biggest worry for dentists and Spotlight Oral Care founders, Lisa and Vanessa, who say it has become one of the biggest problems in recent years.

50% UK adults have tooth decay
Sweet treats should be avoided to maintain good dental health

Lisa explained: “Sugar causes the enamel on your teeth to break down. That says a lot about how powerful sugar is, as enamel is the hardest substance in the human body.

“It is even harder than bone.”

As a result the duo have released three tips to avoid tooth decay.

They say one way to combat the effects of sugar is with a fluoride based toothpaste.

Vanessa said: “Choosing a fluoride based toothpaste can stop tooth decay. This is due to fluoride making the enamel on your teeth stronger.

50% UK adults have tooth decay
Graph showing sugar content in snacks (image supplied)

“It is a mineral that can stop or reverse the effects of tooth decay if caught early. It’s functions are replacing lost tooth minerals and preventing mouth bacteria from making acid.

Additionally, depending on where in the UK you live, there is a concentration of fluoride in your water supply, with some areas containing more than others.

Lisa and Vanessa also recommend regularly  using a fluoride based toothpaste or decay dental floss with active fluoride.

The dentists at Spotlight Oral Care also recommend avoiding both sugary snacks and drinks, along with the no added sugar options that are offered in shops.

According to the team, both are harmful to your teeth and should be avoided.

Finally, the duo say regular dentist visits are a must, to ensure any decay is treated and does not develop further.

 
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