Scots house which includes 17th century castle ruins with links to Robbie Burns could be yours for £450k

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AN OPPORTUNITY has arisen to own the ruins of a historic castle where Robert Burns’ dad worked as a gardener.

William Burnes trained as a gardener at Inverugie Castle in Peterhead, Aberdeenshire in the mid 18th century before moving on to landscaping The Meadows in Edinburgh.

Estate agents Galbraith are selling the historical castle ruins alongside the four-bedroomed 20th century “Castle Coach House” for offers over £450,000.

The castle dates back to the late 16th to early 17th century and was built by Earl William Marschial, which the square and College is named after in Aberdeenshire.

Scots house with 17th century house that robert Burn's dad gardener - Property News Scotland
(Image Galbraith) The castle was owned by numerous important families in Scotland before it came to ruin in 1899

It was an addition to the original defensive tower built in the 12th Century by Reginald Le Chen.

William Burnes trained as a gardener at Inverugie Castle before he took the opportunity to landscape The Meadows by Sir Thomas Hope in Edinburgh.

He then found employment for the first Laird of Fairlie in 1750 in Ayrshire before moving to Carrick and working near Maybole as a tenant farmer.

However, the land was eventually confiscated in 1745 and was bought by the Fergusons of Pitfour.

Scots house with 17th century house that robert Burn's dad gardener - Property News Scotland
(Image: Galbraiths) William Burnes worked as a gardener at the castle ruins before moving to Edinburgh

At the time it was repaired in 1795 and had an observatory added to it.

Where it would be left untouched until Admiral George Ferguson dismantled it in 1837.

He was compensated £5,724 at the time – the equivalent of £547,000 today – after the slavery Abolition Act 1833 and the Slave Compensation Act was passed four years later.

The cottage comes with 1.6 acres of land with brilliant views of the River Ugie and the historic 17th century ruin in the back garden.

Scots house with 17th century house that robert Burn's dad gardener - Property News Scotland
(Image Galbraiths) The property is a four bedroom cottage that has 1.6 acres of land and views of the River Ugie

It has three reception rooms, a bathroom, shower room, a home office and an open plan sitting room.

Images show the modern property contrasting with the old wreckage of the category B listed castle in the background with beautiful views of the River Ugie.

Parts of the ruin remain standing proud in the background with a sign warning people that it is dangerous due to its age.

Interior images show a lovely modern house with bright colours and understated tones to keep in line with the character property.

Scots house with 17th century house that robert Burn's dad gardener - Property News Scotland
(Image Galbraiths) The house has three reception rooms with one being an open planned sitting room

Admiral Ferguson inherited the land from his father George Ferguson, Governor of Trinidad and Tobago and had over 299 slaves upon his death.

He served in the navy during the French Revolution and Napoleonic War before he became an MP and lived in an expensive London mansion.

Inverugie Castle was subsequently demolished in 1899.

A spokesperson for Galbraith said: “This is a rare opportunity to acquire a family home with superb potential and in a beautiful location.

“Worthy of particular note is that the property includes the remains of the historic Inverugie Castle, which lies adjacent to the Castle Coach House.”