Mum claims she “skimmed heart attack” and ended up in hospital after drinking Red Bull

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A “YOUNG AND HEALTHY” mum has claimed she “skimmed a heart attack” and ended up in a resuscitation unit after drinking Red Bull.

Jade Michealla took to Facebook on Saturday to tell others about her experience and said she was hospitalised after drinking the energy juice.

The 27-year-old, from Chilworth, Surrey, said she ended up having to be hooked up to heart monitors after drinking the high caffeinated drink.

Jade Michealla in the hospital | Food and Drink News UK
Jade is convinced that Red Bull was the cause of her irregular heart beat.                                  (C) Jade Michealla Facebook

Jade claims that the popular drink resulted in her having an inflamed heart and irregular heartbeat.

She has since taken to social media and shared images of herself in her hospital gown, hooked up to what appears to be an IV drip. 

Another image shows a close up of Jade’s arm which has what seems to be an IV needle strapped into her vein with white tape surrounding it.

Next to the red bed rail a white medical band can be seen strapped around her wrist. 

Jade posted the images on Saturday, captioned: “I was always that girl who said ‘nah I’ll never get ill from Red Bull, I’m young and healthy and the chance of me getting ill from that is literally nothing’.

“Don’t be that person, I’ve never been so wrong in my life, STAY OFF OF RED BULL PLEASE people! 
 
“It literally poisons your body. I’ve gone from a healthy active 27-year-old to a 27-year-old that’s in resus, hooked up to heart monitors with an inflamed heart and an irregular heartbeat.
 
“If I can stop even just one person from drinking that toxic s*** I will.”
 
She continued: “It kills, it makes people very, very ill and you can say it won’t happen to you, but chances are if you push it, it will.
 
“I’ve had to lay here thinking what would happen to my boys? What would happen to them if they lost me? Their mum…their world.
 

The IV needle in Jade | Food and Drink news UK
Jade is now warning others no to drink the energy juice, claiming that it has the potential to kill. (C) Jade Michealla Facebook

“I’m so lucky to be here, I skimmed a heart attack by the skin of my teeth.
 
“Please, make people aware of the dangers of caffeine, especially Red Bull, before it’s too late.” 

The post has now collected over 6,200 likes with over 60,000 shares from Facebook users who wished Jane a speedy recovery. 
 
Lottiee Haines Guidice said: “Omg I hope you get better soon, that’s bloody horrible.”

Emma Louise Furay said: “Oh my goodness, I’m so glad you’ve come out the otherside!

“I hate these energy drinks for this exact reason.

“I’m just so sorry you’ve had to experience this. Get well soon, I’m sending lots of love.”

Becca Smith said: “Omg this is scary, I drink that stuff like it’s going out of fashion. 

“When I’m running around work it gives me an energy boost. Staying the hell away from it now!”

And Shelley Parker added: “God Jade I hope you’re better soon. I stopped drinking energy drinks about a year ago, now I can’t even drink them at all!” 

In April it was reported that a 21-year-old university student suffered heart failure after “excessive” consumption of energy drinks.

A BMJ Case Report reported that the man drank four 500ml cans every day for two years, leaving him in intensive care and unable to complete his studies.

Doctors considered giving him an organ transplant after tests revealed both his heart and kidneys had failed.

Speaking today a spokesman for Red Bull said: “Red Bull® Energy Drink is available in more than 170 countries because health authorities across the world have concluded that Red Bull® Energy Drink is safe to consume. 

“Almost 7.9 billion cans were consumed last year and over 90 billion cans since Red Bull was created in 1987.

One 250 ml (8.4 fl oz) can of Red Bull® Energy Drink contains about the same amount of caffeine as a cup of coffee (80 mg). 

“The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) concluded in 2009 that the ingredients of energy drinks are of no concern. EFSA demonstrates that there is no scientific justification to treat energy drinks differently than the main contributors to daily caffeine intake in all age groups, i.e. coffee, tea, chocolate and other non-alcoholic beverages. 

“An EFSA opinion of April 2017 reconfirms their opinion on the safety of caffeine from all sources.”