Nurse suspended after bungling bottom injections

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nmc web1A NURSE who bungled a series of injections into patients’ bottoms has been suspended for a year.

Despite two years of mentoring, John Harper was still incapable of finding the correct part of a patient’s bottom for the jags.

Mr Harper, who worked at the Anvil Centre for mental health patients in Glasgow, appeared before the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) at a hearing in Edinburgh this week.

It was found proved that he “failed to locate the upper outer quadrant of the patient’s bottom” on three occasions.

The NMC said that as well as failing to be “safe and consistent” when administering depot injections, he failed to keep a needle sterile by placing it on a cardboard tray.

Case presenter Shelly Brownlee said a depot injection was “a long-acting anti-psychosis injection which stays in the system for a long time”.

She added: “He accepts that despite support for over two years unable to practice at the required standard.”

The incidents took place between 1 July 2009 to 22 November 2011.

Mr Harper also admitted a string of drug administration errors, and only wore one glove during a procedure at a home visit.

Panel chair Stephen Barker said: “The panel considers a 12 month suspension order to be proportionate.

“The panel noted you had an extended period of support which had failed to remediate your shortcomings.”

The nurse agreed with the NMC to be suspended for 12 months.

Leaving the hearing in Edinburgh, Mr Harper commented the outcome of the hearing was “what I expected.”

A NURSE who bungled a series of injections into patients’ bottoms has been suspended for a year.

Despite two years of mentoring, John Harper was still incapable of finding the correct part of a patient’s bottom for the jags.

Mr Harper, who worked at the Anvil Centre for mental health patients in Glasgow, appeared before the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) at a hearing in Edinburgh this week.

It was found proved that he “failed to locate the upper outer quadrant of the patient’s bottom” on three occasions.

The NMC said that as well as failing to be “safe and consistent” when administering depot injections, he failed to keep a needle sterile by placing it on a cardboard tray.

Case presenter Shelley Brownlee said a depot injection was “a long-acting anti-psychosis injection which stays in the system for a long time”.

She added: “He accepts that despite support for over two years unable to practice at the required standard.”

The incidents took place between 1 July 2009 to 22 November 2011.

Mr Harper also admitted a string of drug administration errors, and only wore one glove during a procedure at a home visit.

Panel chair Stephen Barker said: “The panel considers a 12 month suspension order to be proportionate.

“The panel noted you had an extended period of support which had failed to remediate your shortcomings.”

The nurse agreed with the NMC to be suspended for 12 months.

Leaving the hearing in Edinburgh, Mr Harper commented the outcome of the hearing was “what I expected.”

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