Horse welfare charity asks to be remembered in wills

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WORLD Horse Welfare is asking animal lovers help them rescue more abused and neglected horses – via their will.

The charity says it cannot survive without the support of people leaving them gifts in their wills.

“In fact 60% of our income is received in this way,” said the charity in a statement.

It costs on average £6,000 to rehabilitate and rehome a horse

 

“Therefore, from today until Sunday (Monday 2 and Sunday 9 April) we are promoting the benefits of leaving a lasting gift.”

They added: “In 2010, Jennifer Osborn, from the Settle area in North Yorkshire, contacted World Horse Welfare expressing an interest in leaving her horse Indie to us in her Will as she had been diagnosed with a terminal brain tumour.

“Mrs Osborn sadly passed away in that year and we took Indie into our care at our Hall Farm Rescue and Rehoming Centre in Snetterton, Norfolk.  We also were left a sum of money and a share of Mrs Osborn’s jewellery.”

Mrs Osborn had a close relationship with horses and wanted to make sure that Indie went to a new home where he would get lots of attention but he would also get used.

She knew about World Horse Welfare and wanted to find a good home for him.

Indie was rehomed as a ridden horse in March 2011 to Vanessa Strutt who lives near Norwich.

Vanessa hopes to take part in some dressage competitions with him this year, and said: “I’m very touched that someone cared enough for Indie to ensure that he was looked after.

“Selling your horse can mean a very uncertain future for them but leaving a horse to World Horse Welfare, which can then be rehomed to a loving home, is a great option.”

The charity said the money it receives from legacies in Wills makes a huge difference in so many ways to the lives of horses in the future.

It costs £37 for each horse to be examined by their vet upon arrival to one of our UK Rescue and Rehoming Centres.

£300 pays for their dentist to examine and treat 10 horses during her weekly visit.

It costs £6,000 on average to rehabilitate a horse and give it the second chance in life it desperately needs.

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