Vitamin injections helping Michelle Mone get over divorce


BRA queen Michelle Mone is using controversial vitamin injections to help her get over her divorce.

The 41-year-old believes a daily vitamin shot is helping her prepare for a “best ever 2013”.

Vitamin injections, which can cost up to £225 a time, are popular with celebrities like Rihanna, Lady Gaga and Katy Perry who are constantly travelling, performing and attending parties.

Michelle recently split from her husband of 20 years in December.


The treatment, which is usually injected into the patient’s buttocks, could cause infections and allergic reactions, according to critics.

But that hasn’t stopped Mone from giving the treatment a try as part of a detox to help get over 2012.

Mone, who lost six stone last year, admitted she is using the unusual health fad on Twitter, writing: “Detox Day two and still feel like throwing up. Just had another painful vitamin injection #nopainnogain.”

When one fan asked her why she was detoxing she replied: “From a bad year and getting body and mind ready for best ever 2013.”

Fan Nicolle Jeffrey told her: “I feel your pain, vitamin injections are the worst. You’ll do great.”

The Ultimo boss has spoken publically of her distress after her 20-year marriage to husband Michael ended in December last year.

Speaking earlier this year, she said her love-split had left her “crying every day.” The businesswoman revealed the couple failed to make time for each other and became ‘business partners’ only.

A distraught Mone said the break-up had left her ‘numb’, addeding: “I just keep thinking I’m going to be on my own for the rest of my life. I have failed. I have failed in my marriage.”

Mone’s attempt to move on with new man, businessman Karl French, faltered after a few months when they “didn’t have enough time for each other”.

In May, Rihanna tweeted a picture of a scary-looking IV drip in her arm, which was being used to administer a cocktail of energy-boosting vitamins.

Simon Cowell has admitted to using combinations of B12, vitamin C and magnesium to prop-up his immune system.

But despite their popularity, medical experts aren’t convinced that these injections actually work. In fact, there is no scientific or clinical research to suggest that a vitamin boost is beneficial or effective at curing exhaustion.

And some nutritionists also warn that vitamin shots put you at risk of allergic reactions and infections.

Speaking earlier this year, Claire MacEvilly, a nutrition scientist at The British Nutrition Foundation, claimed:  “Vitamin injections are an extreme and dangerous fad which has come from the US.

“It is not very popular over here yet and hopefully will not take off. Overdosing on the non-soluble vitamins by injecting them is easy to do and is a real concern. It can cause cramps, nose-bleeds, nausea, blurred vision, dry skin, liver disease, weight loss, kidney stones and permanent kidney damage, irritability and jaundice. In the most extreme cases it can lead to death.”

Botox injections are another controversial treatment favoured by celebrities
The anti-ageing jabs, that cost £200 or more a time, smooth out wrinkled foreheads and crow’s feet.

But they can leave patients with permanent facial disfigurement.