“It’s Sunday ya f****** weapon!” What boss told worker who tried to pull sickie – on his day off

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A SCOTTISH boss’s hilarious putdown to a staff member who texted in sick on his day off has gone viral.

Mark McLelland, from Glasgow, woke up on what he thought was Monday morning after a night of drinking, and feeling worse for wear, decided to pull a sickie.

But his boss, known only as Greig, showed little sympathy, and after dismissing his excuse as the “worst he’d ever heard”, forcefully pointed out: “It’s Sunday ya “f****** weapon”.

A screenshot of the conversation was posted by Mark on Twitter with the caption: “When you wake up thinking it’s Monday morning and text your gaffer wanting a day off.”

It has since had over 17,000 likes and over 4,500 retweets.

The exchange between the pair

The initial text to Greig reads: “Greig is it alright if I can take a holiday today mate I’ve got the runs man.”

Greig replies: “1 – you need to come up with a better excuse than the runs, that’s the worst ever.

“2 – it’s Sunday ya f****** weapon.”

Mark – the landscape gardener lost track of the days

Mark said: I was at a party on the Friday and I carried on drinking through to the Saturday and I had lost track of what day it was.

“I woke up thinking it was Monday and I couldn’t get out bed so the first thing that came to my mind was the runs.

“I never expected that reply but we usually get on well in work so we both saw the funny side to it.”

Social media users have been delighted at the exchange, calling it “the best thing ever”.

Ashley Graham said: “Best reply I have ever saw made my day this”.

Shannon Burns added: “Actual best thing ever”.

Kristian Jones wrote: “Love that bit ‘ya f****** weapon'”.

Steff Davidson replied: “Mate I’ve phoned in before and I wasn’t on the rota for that day.”

Mark, 20, works as a landscaper and gardener in Glasgow.

His boss Greig said he did not want to comment.

Today, the first Monday in February, has been dubbed “National Sickie Day”. The combination of a Monday and the depths of winter mean around 350,000 people typically call in sick for work.

Employment law experts ELAS estimate today’s absences will cost the UK economy around £45m in wages, lost hours and overtime.

 
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