Civitatis launches competition in aid of the #stayathome initiative

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A LEADING of selling touristy activities and experience has launched a new photo competition giving the lucky winner a trip to their chosen destination with 4 star accommodation.

Civitatis came up with the idea to keep people entertained while stuck indoors during the lockdown and to keep the spirits of restless travellers up.

The company launched their #TravelFromHome photo competition offering the winner a trip to their chosen destination with 4 star accomodation, airport transfers and a range of activities to choose fro.

To take part in the fun initiative travellers have to take a picture of themselves ‘travelling’ from the comfort of their own home.

The Colosseum lit up at night (C) John Glover

This could be using  toy animals and houseplants to re-create a safari  or building your own Colosseum and re-enacting gladiatorial battles to pretending your watching the 2018 World Cup final again. To enter users must upload the photo to Instagram, tagging @civitatis_en and anyone else you want to take on your trip.

The competition is opened from March 26 to April 1. Civitatis added last week the “Free tour of your home” to their thousands of activities. With your cat as your guide, you’ll discover the exotic cultures hiding in the forgotten food at the back of the fridge, as well as secrets such as “why is toilet paper worth its weight in gold?” “where on earth did all those magnets come from?” Not only will it lead you to undiscovered corners of your home (and perhaps to all those socks you’ve lost in the wash) but 100% of the funds collected are donated to charity

You can donate  €1, €3, €5 or €10, or simply take part as a way of supporting the initiative with Civitatis adding an extra 10% to everything collected. Your donation of €5 becomes €5.50, or €10 turns into €11. All for charity, in the fight against coronavirus.

 
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